Dave Maxwell Culen Highbe lifts up Tyce Campbell to let him dunk the basketball before the PVHS-Virgin Valley game. A special benefit was held that night for the Campbell family and their 2-year old that is battling cancer.

Dave Maxwell
Culen Highbe lifts up Tyce Campbell to let him dunk the basketball before the PVHS-Virgin Valley game. A special benefit was held that night for the Campbell family and their 2-year old that is battling cancer.

The Tough for Tyce fund raising benefit for the 2-year old son of Amy and Brad Campbell was held during the basketball games with Virgin Valley in Alamo last Saturday.

Amy Campbell, the former Amy Higbee, was a standout basketball player for PVHS and helped the team win four consecutive Division IV state championships, 2003-2006.

Her son Tyce, was diagnosed in 2015 with rhabdomyosarcoma, the most common soft tissue cancer found in children. It is usually quite fast growing to other parts of the body. Children can develop it at any age, but it is most common in those between 2 and 6 years old, and between 15-19 years old. Boys tend to have it more than girls.

A series of chemotherapy treatments did not succeed in stopping the cancer, and in November doctors amputated his leg at the knee. Four days later, Amy gave birth to her second child.

All the proceeds and donations of the fundraiser were given to the Campbell family to help with the medical costs.

Amy herself was presented with her old high school jersey with her name on the back and mounted in a specially made frame.

Her former coach Amy Huntsman said it’s the first time in her 22-year career, she has ever given a former player their original jersey. It doesn’t mean the number is retired, in fact current PVHS player Karley Whipple wears the same number, but it does recall the fine career Higbee had as a player for the Lady Panthers.

Campbell, who lives in Fernley, said she was very emotional regarding the benefit done for her family. “I wish I could explain how much it means to me. It’s hard, but I appreciate it so much, and I feel I will forever owe my sweet town for everything they have done.”

At the beginning of the boys game, Tyce was carried by the team captains to meet with the referees at center court for the pre-game instructions. During the player introductions of the starting five, Tabor Maxwell carried Tyce out onto the floor as a member of the lineup.

A special jump ball was held using a child’s size ball. Virgin Valley also participated in what was happening, as Jacob Roemer tipped the ball to Cody Williams who handed it to center Culen Highbe. Highbe, standing on a short step stool, then held Tyce high over his head and let the youngster dunk the ball through the hoop, to the cheers of the crowd. Then a special photo was taken of both teams gathered around the Campbell family.

Tyce doesn’t know he is handicapped and is as active and curious as any 2-year old, scooting up and down the steps at the gym and crawling on the chairs the players sit on.

He is expected to get a prosthetic leg very soon.

A Gymkhana event was held for Tyce last August at the Alamo Rodeo Grounds and raised about $3,000.